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Author Topic: solar heating design  (Read 1401 times)

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Offline Corylus

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solar heating design
« on: July 03, 2013, 10:55:57 PM »
I don't know about other systems, but these vacuum tubes seem to be more efficient that the rest of the system can cope with, so that overheating is an issue. I have wondered since the first time ours went into earthquake mode why on earth they don't come with an automatic shade that can slide over the panel when the temperature gets too high. It can't be that difficult to design such a thing. And if it was designed to allow you to over ride the auto, you might be able to go and leave the damn thing when you go on holiday in high summer without worrying about what it's up to while you are away.

When I have grumbled about this - I was told it would be too expensive and people wouldn't buy it - which is bollocks. All you need to get past that one is to market it properly. It would save things like dump valves and the header spouting I've seen so much of recently. This tech is supposed to be "good for the environment". Ha! In order to keep ours in check we have used/abused more water one way or another than we have in our entire lives. We are first off a finite rural system and water we waste is water someone else doesn't get.

The advice we got about our holiday problem? Stick a tarp over it. So here we are with this state of the art technology on the roof and an old man with a tarp in a gale up there pussyfooting round 20 vacuum tubes trying to tie it in place? Yeah right. Well he did it once. It's easier just to not go on holiday!

Linkback: https://www.plumbers.nz/solar-heating-and-heat-pumps/9/solar-heating-design/1499/

Offline 07442

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Re: solar heating design
« Reply #1 on: July 09, 2013, 09:10:07 PM »
there is another system which doesn't overheat and play up like the overly complicated one you've described in your previous posts.
it's the only one I'll install.  Rheem premier solar. it's a glycol pumped system, doesn't require air bleed valves or frost protection for the panels as the panels drain down when boost from them isn't required. example. the water in the tank is hot, the, sun is shining. the clever integrated electronics turn off the pump, gravity takes over, the glycol water mix empties into a chamber inside the cylinder, the panels will stay empty and unaffected by the sun till the thermostat calls for heat and turns the pump on, filling the panels again. it's a clean and tidy installation, both above the roof and in the cupboard. the pump, electronic bits and pieces are all contained within the casing of the cylinder itself. its installed like every other mains pressure hot water tank,  but has 2 extra connections on the top of the tank for the solar flow and return.
as far as holidays go, there isn't a holiday mode to switch on, doesn't need a cover draped over it to stop it misbehaving, either turn off the power to it, or leave it on, it takes 30 minutes from stone cold on a sunny day to make 265l of hot water.
it in my opinion is the best and least complicated solar system on the market.
those vacuum tubes scare the bejesus outa me.

here ends my first post of the year.


Offline Corylus

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Re: solar heating design
« Reply #2 on: July 23, 2013, 01:16:28 PM »
Hello 07442. Apologies for the late reply - I haven't been visiting for a while. I was most interested to read of your suggestion and will investigate further. It's a completely different approach and I kinda like it at first glance anyway. Thanks for the input. Much appreciated.  :)

Offline Corylus

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Re: solar heating design
« Reply #3 on: July 23, 2013, 05:23:13 PM »
Hello again 07442 if you haven't given up looking for a reply.

I'm not very good at making the best of web sites, but an initial glance at the Rheems website indicates an enormous HWC which wouldn't fit into our airing cupboard. I see it can be installed outside? Hardly an option here. In your experience - do they have smaller cylinders? I see they do - but not solar ready. Am I right?

Offline 07442

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Re: solar heating design
« Reply #4 on: July 31, 2013, 10:25:50 PM »
hi. been a bit slack visiting the site myself. the Rheem. system I'm talking about is one size only. indoor only last time Iooked. yes they are big tanks. 640 or 650mm in diameter, but not very tall. not suitable for every situation, it's size is due to the fact it has a tank within the tank to store the glycol when not required in the panels.

Offline Corylus

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Re: solar heating design
« Reply #5 on: August 06, 2013, 10:01:02 PM »
Thanks for that - I rather thought that would be the case. Good idea though.


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